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Project Gutenberg's Stories by American Authors, Volume 5, by Various This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Stories by American Authors, Volume 5 Contents: A Light Man, By Henry James. Yatil, By F.D. Millet. The End Of New York, By Park Benjamin. Why Thomas Was Discharged, By George Arnold. The Tachypomp, By E.P. Mitchell Author: Various Release Date: March 4, 2004 [EBook #11437] [Date last updated: January 22, 2005] Language: English Character set encoding: ASCII *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK STORIES AMERICAN, VOL. 5 *** Produced by Stan Goodman and PG Distributed Proofreaders [Illustration: H. James] Stories by American Authors V. A LIGHT MAN. By Henry James. YATIL. By F.D. Millet. THE END OF NEW YORK. By Park Benjamin. WHY THOMAS WAS DISCHARGED. By George Arnold. THE TACHYPOMP. By E.P. Mitchell. 1884 A LIGHT MAN. BY Henry James.[1] "And I--what I seem to my friend, you see-- What I soon shall seem to his love, you guess. What I seem to myself, do you ask of me? No hero, I confess." _A Light Woman.--Browning's Men and Women_. April 4, 1857.--I have changed my sky without changing my mind. I resume these old notes in a new world. I hardly know of what use they are; but it's easier to stick to the habit than to drop it. I have been at home now a week--at home, forsooth! And yet, after all, it is home. I am dejected, I am bored, I am blue. How can a man be more at home than that? Nevertheless, I am the citizen of a great country, and for that matter, of a great city. I walked to-day some ten miles or so along Broadway, and on the whole I don't blush for my native land. We are a capable race and a good-looking withal; and I don't see why we shouldn't prosper as well as another. This, by the way, ought to be a very encouraging reflection. A capable fellow and a good-looking withal; I don't see why he shouldn't die a millionaire. At all events he must do something. When a man has, at thirty-two, a net income of considerably less than nothing, he can scarcely hope to overtake a fortune before he himself is overtaken by age
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