FREE BOOKS

Author's List




PREV.   NEXT  
|<   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43  
44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   >>   >|  
s it rose on the gale, Found Bob at the plow, and his wife at the pail. A neat little cottage in front of a grove, Where in youth they first gave their young hearts up to love, Was the solace of age, and to them doubly dear, As it called up the past, with a smile or a tear. Each tree had its thought, and the vow could impart, That mingled in youth, the warm wish of the heart: The thorn was still there, and the blossoms it bore, And the song from its top seemed the same as before. When the curtain of night over nature was spread, And Bob had returned from the plow to his shed, Like the dove on her nest, he reposed from all care, If his wife and his youngsters contented were there. I have passed by his door when the evening was gray, And the hill and the landscape were fading away, And have heard from the cottage, with grateful surprise, The voice of thanksgiving, like incense arise. And I thought on the proud, who look down with scorn, On the neat little cottage, the grove and the thorn, And felt that the riches and tinsels of life, Were dross, to contentment, with Bob and his wife. * * * * * [FROM DICKENS'S HOUSEHOLD WORDS.] CLASS OPINIONS. A FABLE. A lamb strayed for the first time into the woods, and excited much discussion among the other animals. In a mixed company, one day, when he became the subject of a friendly gossip, the goat praised him. "Pooh!" said the lion, "this is too absurd. The beast is a pretty beast enough, but did you hear him roar? I heard him roar, and, by the manes of my fathers, when he roars he does nothing but cry ba-a-a!" And the lion bleated his best in mockery, but bleated far from well. "Nay," said the deer, "I do not think so badly of his voice. I liked him well enough until I saw him leap. He kicks with his hind legs in running and, with all his skipping, gets over very little ground." "It is a bad beast altogether," said the tiger. "He cannot roar, he cannot run, he can do nothing--and what wonder? I killed a man yesterday, and, in politeness to the new comer, offered him a bit; upon which he had the impudence to look disgusted, and say, 'No, sir, I eat nothing but grass.'" So the beasts criticized the lamb, each in his own way; and yet it was a good lamb, nevertheless. * * * * * AUTHORS AND BOOKS. * * * *
PREV.   NEXT  
|<   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43  
44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   >>   >|  



Top keywords:
cottage
 

thought

 

bleated

 

company

 

subject

 

mockery

 
pretty
 
absurd
 

fathers

 

friendly


animals

 

praised

 
gossip
 

disgusted

 

impudence

 

offered

 

AUTHORS

 

beasts

 

criticized

 

politeness


yesterday

 

running

 
skipping
 
discussion
 

killed

 

ground

 

altogether

 
blossoms
 

mingled

 

impart


curtain
 
nature
 

spread

 

returned

 

hearts

 

called

 

doubly

 

solace

 

contentment

 
tinsels

riches

 

DICKENS

 

excited

 

strayed

 

HOUSEHOLD

 
OPINIONS
 

contented

 

youngsters

 

passed

 

evening