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The Project Gutenberg EBook of International Weekly Miscellany, Vol. I, No. 6, by Various This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: International Weekly Miscellany, Vol. I, No. 6 Of Literature, Art, And Science, New York, August 5, 1850 Author: Various Release Date: October 6, 2004 [EBook #13643] Language: English Character set encoding: ASCII *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY *** Produced by Joshua Hutchinson, William Flis, the PG Online Distributed Proofreading Team, and Cornell University INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MISCELLANY Of Literature, Art, and Science. * * * * * Vol. I. NEW YORK, AUGUST 5, 1850. No. 6. * * * * * GERMAN CRITICISM ON ENGLISH FEMALE ROMANCE WRITERS. We translate the following for the _International_ from a letter dated London, June 15, to the _Cologne Gazette_. "Among the most remarkable writers of romances in England, three women are entitled to be reckoned in the first rank, namely, Miss Jewsbury, Miss Bronte, and Mrs. Gaskell. Miss Jewsbury issued her first work about four years since, a novel, in three volumes, under the title of 'Zoe,' and since then she has published the 'Half Sisters.' Both these works are excellent in manner as well as ideas, and show that their author is a woman of profound thought and deep feeling. Both are drawn from country life and the middle class, a sphere in which Miss Jewsbury is at home. The tendency of the first is speculative, and is based on religion; that of the second is social, relating to the position of woman. "Miss Jewsbury is still young, for an authoress. She counts only some thirty years, and many productions may be confidently expected from her hand, though perhaps none will excel those already published, for, after gaining a certain climax, no one excels himself. Her usual residence is Manchester; it is but seldom that she visits the metropolis; she is now here. She has lively and pleasing manners, a slight person, fine features, a beautiful, dreamy, light brown eye. She is attractive without being beautiful, retiring, altogether without pretensions, and in conversation is neither brillian
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